5 safety measures employees should observe during the holiday travel.

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5 safety measures employees should observe during the holiday travel.

Many employees’ holiday travel is a fact of life. Some people carry their laptops and smartphones, perhaps intellectual property with relatives to check out interesting video, or take photos of local festivals. But doing so may expose myriad digital risks without even realizing it.

Why do bad characters want to locate employees who travel?

The answer is simple. The problem is what they can do if they can steal corporate intellectual property from a business person’s device. Julie weed explores this risk in an article in the New York times:

Investment plans, merger and acquisition research, marketing planning, and other information theft may bring income and the loss of market position, and the national defense foundation of democracy [Samantha] Ravich lady told the senate foreign relations committee this year. She described the country to support the economic potential of mass effects of war, she said, could undermine delivery is critical to manufacturing, a malware incident could damage travel and network attack, forced the company to shut down their website.

In order to obtain the valuable information, cookies can use a “complex” tool to steal business people from potential unprotected mobile phone, tablet or laptop on the transfer of intellectual property rights. After all, digital attacks on hotels are not new. Bad actors can steal guests, equipment and data by infecting a hotel’s computer network with malware. Or they may already be infected with the poorly protected wi-fi networks of relatives who are going on holiday.

Fortunately, companies can help protect employees who travel during holidays from these and other digital threats. They can use better security controls on their employees’ hardware and follow standard digital safety recommendations by training employees. Here are five security practices, especially for business people returning home on holiday and hiring their organizations:

1. Multi-factor authentication (MFA)

Verizon Enterprise found in its 2017 data disclosure report (DBIR) that more than three quarters (81 per cent) of data breaches were compromised using stolen or weak passwords. Through multi-factor authentication (MFA), organizations can help prevent these types of violations. Even if someone steals the company login information for the travel employee, these measures can protect the access to the company’s account.

2. Access management of the institute.

During holiday travel, employees may need to access the enterprise resources hosted in the cloud through mobile devices and laptops. Companies can ensure that only authorized personnel can through access to view your managed intellectual property management strategy, the access management strategy based on various attributes (such as location, equipment type and resource sensitivity) to manage the access of cloud applications.

3. Encrypt sensitive data.

Committed criminals can find solutions to corporate access control and establish links with sensitive data. Companies can defend against this possibility by investing in encryption. These measures should include static data encryption (protection of information wherever you are) and dynamic data encryption (protection of data over the network).

Disable bluetooth and access free wi-fi.

Malicious actors can hide on public wi-fi networks and use bluetooth devices to attract business travelers. Employees can escape these criminals by connecting to a secure wi-fi network and turning off bluetooth whenever they travel abroad. They should also consider using VPNS when searching the Web, or enterprise VPN solutions implemented by enterprises to access any business system.

Update your software.

The attacker knows that the employee does not always update the device in time. As a result, they develop code that exploits open vulnerabilities. They should make sure their software is up to date before employees are on holiday. Once they come back, they should check any additional software updates and scan their computers for malware.

Through data security best practices ensure that your organization’s travel staff are safe and secure the best practices of the secure mobile toolkit. Why do bad characters want to locate employees who travel?

The answer is simple. The problem is what they can do if they can steal corporate intellectual property from a business person’s device. Julie weed explores this risk in an article in the New York times:

Investment plans, merger and acquisition research, marketing planning, and other information theft may bring income and the loss of market position, and the national defense foundation of democracy [Samantha] Ravich lady told the senate foreign relations committee this year. She described the country to support the economic potential of mass effects of war, she said, could undermine delivery is critical to manufacturing, a malware incident could damage travel and network attack, forced the company to shut down their website.

In order to obtain the valuable information, cookies can use a “complex” tool to steal business people from potential unprotected mobile phone, tablet or laptop on the transfer of intellectual property rights. After all, digital attacks on hotels are not new. Bad actors can steal guests, equipment and data by infecting a hotel’s computer network with malware. Or they may already be infected with the poorly protected wi-fi networks of relatives who are going on holiday.

Fortunately, companies can help protect employees who travel during holidays from these and other digital threats. They can use better security controls on their employees’ hardware and follow standard digital safety recommendations by training employees. Here are five security practices, especially for business people returning home on holiday and hiring their organizations:

1. Multi-factor authentication (MFA)

Verizon Enterprise found in its 2017 data disclosure report (DBIR) that more than three quarters (81 per cent) of data breaches were compromised using stolen or weak passwords. Through multi-factor authentication (MFA), organizations can help prevent these types of violations. Even if someone steals the company login information for the travel employee, these measures can protect the access to the company’s account.

2. Access management of the institute.

During holiday travel, employees may need to access the enterprise resources hosted in the cloud through mobile devices and laptops. Companies can ensure that only authorized personnel can through access to view your managed intellectual property management strategy, the access management strategy based on various attributes (such as location, equipment type and resource sensitivity) to manage the access of cloud applications.

3. Encrypt sensitive data.

Committed criminals can find solutions to corporate access control and establish links with sensitive data. Companies can defend against this possibility by investing in encryption. These measures should include static data encryption (protection of information wherever you are) and dynamic data encryption (protection of data over the network).

Disable bluetooth and access free wi-fi.

Malicious actors can hide on public wi-fi networks and use bluetooth devices to attract business travelers. Employees can escape these criminals by connecting to a secure wi-fi network and turning off bluetooth whenever they travel abroad. They should also consider using VPNS when searching the Web, or enterprise VPN solutions implemented by enterprises to access any business system.

Update your software.

The attacker knows that the employee does not always update the device in time. As a result, they develop code that exploits open vulnerabilities. They should make sure their software is up to date before employees are on holiday. Once they come back, they should check any additional software updates and scan their computers for malware.

Through data security best practices ensure that your organization’s travel staff are safe and secure the best practices of the secure mobile toolkit.

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