Alessia Cara has turned her “growing pains” into pop perfection

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For Alessia Cara, releasing the music was “a bit like riding a bicycle,” she told BAZAAR.com. “You just have to learn how to do it again.” She is still thinking about how to talk about her new single, because in the end, it’s not just explaining the track. “This is trying to figure out how to explain what I have been doing for the past three years,” said the creative singer.

Carla will be 22 years old next month and she will easily become a pop singer in 2015 from her reputation on YouTube. Or, her first album, Know All It All, got platinum sales in the same year. She can also mention that she recorded an Oscar-nominated Disney song in 2016 and was very willing to win the Grammy’s Best Newcomer award earlier this year. But instead, she used her new single “The Worries of Growing Up” to deal with the inevitable struggles in the growth process.

About a year and a half ago, she created this song with her iconic pop style. At the time, she fell into a period of romance, was not sure of her feelings, and was adapting to her new fame. She sang in the second quarter: “When I face the pressure of confusion I create, I don’t even know if I care about ‘growing up’ if it’s just one person.”

This is the first song Carla wrote for her upcoming second album, “The Pain of Growth.” She said that this is a pain in her album distribution. It only means that she has more in her work. . Below, Kara describes how she grew up as an adult, how to face loneliness, and how to expect from her new era of music.

“Bazaar”: Where does the inspiration for “Growing Worries” come from?

Alessia Cara: When I wrote this book, I felt lost in everything I did and was lost in my work and responsibility. It’s really confusing. I’m not only a 21-year-old woman. It’s hard enough, and I’m also part of a very unusual and very different lifestyle. It can be a little scary. I think these two things have formed an emotional distance in my mind. I know I should be happy because I am fulfilling my dreams, but I am not very satisfied with myself. I want to write a song about it, but I call it “the pain of growing up” and give it some little hope because I think all the pain is something that we can grow up or grow to some extent. I say so, this is not forever.

HB: Your music really celebrates young people. In “Seventeen,” you are talking about the “freezing time” of that age. Is growth a concern for you?

It’s a bit, because to some extent, you have to grow much faster than others. This is a completely different responsibility. I was not used to doing this before, and I was not prepared for this role and did not anticipate it. Of course, there are many positive aspects. It is a blessing to have such responsibilities. But at the same time, when you are still a person who is not yet fully matured, this may cause a lot of confusion in your mind and also make you lack of care for yourself. I am very focused on caring for others and making sure that I pass this information to others.

HB: For songs like “Here” and “The Beautiful Scarf for You,” you are really shouting for the losers. Did your fans, especially young women, have the initiative to contact you and say that your music touched them?

I receive information every day. Such a beautifully dissonant thing just makes a song because you feel that the people in real life, one to one, tell you that this is changing their lives, they like to be themselves in a new way, or They can come out of their family. People can find comfort in your sense of insecurity. This is strange, but surprisingly, there are so many people on the same boat. I think the more you talk about general feelings, the more we realize that people are much more similar than we think.

AC: It’s hard to say because you think the Grammy Award is like “All in my hand.” But I hope to win one of my entire projects one day. This is what I got as my artist. It’s amazing, but it’s good to win something for a project. In addition to honor – because that is only a small part of what I do, why do I do this – there are so many. There is always a new attempt. There is always a new goal to achieve. I think if you think, “Oh, I have done everything and I have nothing to do,” then it doesn’t make sense.

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